What is considered reckless driving in Virginia?

The Commonwealth of Virgnia is very clear about what it considers to be reckless driving, and it takes the charge very seriously. As reckless driving is a criminal offense in Virginia, you could end up with a misdemeanor or even a felony conviction on your record if you aren't aware of the laws and don't take the charges seriously.

Reckless Driving Violations

According to the Virgnia Department of Motor Vehicles, the following violations will result in a reckless driving charge in Virginia:

  • Speeding in excess of 80 mph
  • Speeding 20 mph or more above the posted speed limit
  • Racing
  • Passing or overtaking an emergency vehicle
  • Passing a school bus
  • Passing on the crest of a hill
  • Passing at a railroad crossing
  • Passing two vehicles abreast
  • Driving two vehicles abreast
  • Driving too fast for conditions
  • Failing to give a proper signal
  • Faulty brakes/improper control
  • Reckless driving on parking lots, etc.
  • Reckless driving with an obstructed view

If charged and convicted of reckless driving in Virginia under these regulations, you could face the following consequences:

  • Six demerit points on your license. Demerit points will stay on your license for at least two years and will affect insurance rates and consequences of additional traffic tickets.
  • A criminal record. If you’re convicted, the misdemeanor criminal charge will remain on your record. Having such a conviction can cause difficulty when applying for jobs, loans, etc. and can permanently mar your reputation.
  • Loss of job or security clearance. Since the conviction will cause you to have a criminal record, this could affect your security clearance and job security.
  • Increased insurance rates. Insurance companies commonly raise rates for people viewed as greater risks, including those convicted of reckless driving offenses.
  • License suspension. Conviction of reckless driving in Virginia could result in suspension of your license, making it difficult to get to work.
  • Jail time. While unusual, a judge could order jail time if you are driving in excess of 90 mph.

For more information on how to fight charges and avoid legal consequences, contact us today at (804) 835-5127, or come see us at our Lexington or Petersburg offices.  We’ll be happy to discuss your case and provide you with the quality advice and guidance you need. Contact us today!